December 2010

Assange “objected to segregation”, says lawyer

December 22, 2010

So Mark Stephens has told me in a tweet within the last half hour. Here’s his response yes. They had a long discussion about it. to my follow-up inquiry One more point, Mark: did JA object to the governor’s segregation decision? Earlier today I told you Mark Stephens had denied Assange himself asked to be […]

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LibCon: is the process fair to Julian Assange?

December 22, 2010

Sunny Hundal has published an important piece at Liberal Conspiracy today – one that Benjamin Gray has contributed to, as have I, a bit – arising from Ben Goldacre’s frustration that the mainstream media didn’t seem to be fact-checking the claims and implications of unfairness being made by or on behalf of Julian Assange over […]

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Assange’s lawyer denies he requested segregation

December 22, 2010

Julian Assange’s lawyer Mark Stephens made the denial in a tweet to me this morning: he didn’t Carl. Have confirmed to anyone who asked. It was the Governors decision, sd to be for safety. For a few days now I’ve been trying to get to the bottom of how Assange came to be held “in […]

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Taking Vince Cable off the BSkyB case

December 21, 2010

Vince Cable has not resigned over his reported remark that he’d “declared war on Rupert Murdoch” – but the Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt will make any further decision on the proposed News Corporation takeover of BSkyB instead of him. There are a number of legal points to be made about this. First, there’s no constitutional […]

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Prisoners’ votes: the government triangulates

December 17, 2010

Today has seen the failure in the Court of Appeal of the judicial review in Chester v Justice Secretary, a case that always was hopeless. More importantly, the government intends to give the vote to all prisoners serving less than four year sentences; and to give trial judges the power to ban even these from […]

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Julian Assange: no further appeal, and complying with bail conditions

December 16, 2010

As I write, Julian Assange may still be in custody, while the necessary processing work is done by the people who’ve stood surety for him, according to media reports. You’ll see that under section 8(4) and (5) of the Bail Act 1976, the sureties will have to be considered acceptable by the police, if they’re […]

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How electronic tagging works

December 16, 2010

One of the bail conditions Julian Assange will be subject to it electronic monitoring – to make sure he’s actually at the Suffolk premises he’s supposed to be at during the periods of his curfew. If you want to know how it works, here’s a guide prepared for judges by the security firm Serco – […]

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Photos from outside the High Court today

December 16, 2010

I passed by the High Court today just to see what the media scrum looks like – here are some photos that give an impression of the media scrum and the small pro-Assange demo. No one there seemed to have any idea what was actually going on.

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It was the CPS who decided to appeal

December 15, 2010

The CPS has phoned me to confirm it took the decision to appeal bail yesterday in Julian Assange’s case – without consulting the Swedish prosecutor. The CPS spokesman stressed to me that this is usual practice in extradition cases. The CPS makes all decisions on bail, apparently. That is in line with article 12 of […]

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Who decided to appeal Julian Assange’s bail?

December 15, 2010

Our own CPS is the answer, I think. Here’s a report from a Swedish media source quoting Karin Rosander, spokeswoman for the Swedish prosecuting authority, as saying the decision to appeal was the CPS’s alone, not theirs. It quotes her as denying her office was involved (translation by Google): It is not true. I have […]

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